NPRE 441: Principles of Radiation Protection

Spring, 2017

 

 

Course Description

 

Primary: J. Turner, "Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection", Third Edition, Wiley-VHC, Inc. (2007).

Reference books:

[1] H. Cember - "Introduction to Health Physics", 4th Edition, McGraw-Hill (2010)

[2] J. K. Shultis and R. E. Faw, "Radiation Shielding," American Nuclear Society (2000)
[3] R. E. Faw and J. K. Shultis, "Radiological Assessment: Sources and Doses, American Nuclear Society (1999)
[4] E. L. Alpen, "Radiation Biophysics," Academic Press (1998)
[5] G. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurements, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 1999.

 
Course Website:
http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/npre441/

 

Course components:

8 homework: 20% (towards the final score)

6-8 quizzes: 30%

Midterm exam: 15%

Final exam: 20%

Term project: 15%

 

TA and Office Hours:

TAs:

Long Zhou, <longz2@illinois.edu>

Brandon Lee, <btlee2@illinois.edu>

 

Office Hours:

Thursday 2-4pm and Friday 10-noon at the Student Lunge in Talbot Lab. 

 

 

Lecture Notes

Introduction

 

Chapter 1: Review of Physical Principles

§ Units, dimensions and energy and energy transferring.

§ Basic physical principles.

 

Chapter 2: Atomic and Nuclear Structures

§ Atomic structures.

§ The nucleus.

 

Chapter 3: Radioactivity

§ Radioactivity. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

§ Transformation kinetics, serial transformation and naturally occurring radioactivity.

 

Additional reading material for Chapter 2:

Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 in H. Cember, Introduction to Health Physics, Fourth Edition, 2010.

 

Chapter 4: Interactions of Radiation with Matter

§ Interactions of beta particles and heavy charged particles.

§ Interactions of photons I – interaction of photons in absorbing media.

§ Interactions of photons II – attenuation coefficients and energy absorption.

§ Interactions of neutrons.

 

Chapter 5: Methods for Radiation Detection

§ Gas-filled detectors, ionization process, charge migration, ionization counters and proportional counters.

§ Scintillation detectors.

§ Semiconductor detectors.

§ Neutron detection techniques.

 

Additional reading material for Chapter 5:

K. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurements, Chapter 6-8,11.

 

Chapter 6: Counting Statistics

§ Statistical models for radiation decay processes, Binomial and Poisson models.

Reading: James E. Turner, Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, Chapter 11, Section 1-4, pp. 289 – 300.

§ Binomial and Poisson and Gaussian models, error propagation. Reading: James E. Turner, Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, 11, Section 1-4, pp. 301 – 314.

§ Delectability limits, false positive and false negative. Reading: James E. Turner, Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, 11, Section 1-4, pp. 327 – 335.

 

Chapter 7: Radiation Dosimetry

§ Units, dose, exposure, dose-exposure relationship.

§ Specific gamma ray emission, dose from beta and gamma ray radiation.

§ Internal deposited radioisotopes, the MIRD methods.

§ Neutron induced radiation dose.

 

Chapter 8: Biological Effect of Radiation

§ Physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation. Reading: Tuner, p. 386-424.

§ Biological effect of ionizing radiation. Reading: Tuner, p. 386-424.

§ Reading: James E. Turner, Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, Chapter 9-12 and Chapter 13-16.

 

Chapter 9: Radiation Protection Criteria and Exposure Limits

§ Introduction to the basic concepts for radiation protection.

§ ICRP dose limits.

 

Chapter 10: External Radiation Protection

§ Basic principles, gamma ray shielding considerations.

§ X-ray shielding design.

§ Beta and neutron shielding.

 

Here is a summary for helping you to prepare for the final.

 

Homework

Homework 1 and Solution. Due at 5pm on Monday, Feb. 6th, 2017. Please return your homework to my office at 111E Talbot Lab.

Homework 2 and Solution. Due at 5pm on Wednesday, Feb. 15th, 2017.

Homework 3 and Solution. Due at 5pm on Monday, Feb. 27th, 2017.

Homework 4 and Solution. Due at 5pm on Monday, Mar. 6th, 2017.

 

 

Term Project

In this term project, each team of 4-5 students will

(a) review and study a reference paper listed here.

(b) write a short (four-page) essay based on the following format (due on April 28), and

(c) present a review presentation on April 24 (Groups 1-5) and April 26 (Group 6-10). Each team will have 15 mins for presentation and 5 mins for Q/A. Your presentation should follow the same format as for the short assay.

 

Quizzes

We will have 4-6 pop-quizzes throughout the semester. These quizzes are typically open-book unless stated otherwise. You could use your textbook and computer to browse lecture notes. Please see here for the rules for missing quizzes.

 

Make-up Quizzes: For people who missed an in-class quiz, you will be given the opportunity of a make-up quiz if

1.      You have notified me before the lecture, and

2.      You could provide a proof that you will be missing the lecture for “good” reasons, such as attending conference, sick leave, travel for interview.

 

Quiz 1, Solution.

Quiz 2, Solution.

Quiz 3, Solution.

Quiz 4, Solution.

Quiz 5, Solution.

 

 

Exams

Midterm Exam Info:

Date: noon-2pm, Wednesday, March 15th.

Format: open book. You can bring your textbook and lecture notes during the exam.

Content covered: All chapters and sections covered in lectures from Jan 20 – March 8. Here is a list of key concepts covered in Chapters 3 and 4.

 

Final Exam Info:

TBA